10 Best Croatia Travel Guide

Updated on: May 2021

Best Croatia Travel Guide in 2021


Lonely Planet Croatia (Country Guide)

Lonely Planet Croatia (Country Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

DK Eyewitness Croatia (Travel Guide)

DK Eyewitness Croatia (Travel Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021

Fodor's Essential Croatia: with a Side Trip to Montenegro (Travel Guide)

Fodor's Essential Croatia: with a Side Trip to Montenegro (Travel Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021

Rick Steves Croatia & Slovenia

Rick Steves Croatia & Slovenia
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021

Rick Steves Croatia & Slovenia

Rick Steves Croatia & Slovenia
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021

The Rough Guide to Croatia (Travel Guide eBook)

The Rough Guide to Croatia  (Travel Guide eBook)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Croatia

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Croatia
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
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Moon Croatia & Slovenia (Travel Guide)

Moon Croatia & Slovenia (Travel Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021

DK Eyewitness Top 10 Dubrovnik and the Dalmatian Coast (Pocket Travel Guide)

DK Eyewitness Top 10 Dubrovnik and the Dalmatian Coast (Pocket Travel Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021

Lonely Planet Croatia (Country Guide)

Lonely Planet Croatia (Country Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
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Visit Croatia - a Walk Around the Capital, Zagreb

A visit to the capital city of Croatia: Zagreb.

One won't find a lot of tourists in Zagreb. Croatia is mostly known for its sea resorts, and Zagreb is quite far from the coast of the country hence most tourists fly directly to the coastal areas skipping Zagreb all together. But the city is definitely worth the visit.

The central part of Croatia and Zagreb is fundamentally different from the coastal areas of the country. One can easily notice differences of climate, culture , architecture and cuisine. Those visiting here for the first time, will feel like they are in Austria or the Czech Republic. This is inherently different from the rest of the country which isn't quite up to the mark.

Basically this impression is derived by the surrounding architecture. Most of the buildings in Zagreb were built during the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which consisted of Croatia. This explains the resemblance to other European capitals. However, on a closer examination, one can clearly identify the individual traits of this ancient city. Especially interesting for tourists is the historical city center, which has buildings and monuments from the early Middle Ages.

Center Zagreb is divided into the so-called Upper Town - the oldest part of Zagreb, and Lower Town - a newer part of town which hosts various museums and galleries.

The first written mention of Zagreb was back in 1094 AD. This was when King Ladislaus the First founded the bishopric at Mount Kaptol. Near the bishopric was the city of Hradec. Artisans who occupied it , declared it a free city in 1242 AD.

Later, in 1851, Hradec amp; Kaptol united to form a single city called Zagreb. And together they now constitute the upper town area.

The upper city is famous for its architectural landmarks, many cozy cafes and restaurants and the picturesque market area which is famous for its fresh fruit. The central square in Zagreb is named Bana Jelacic - after the national hero of Croatia. Turning to the right of the central area, you'll see the monument of St. Stephen's Cathedral looming over the Kaptolskoy area. This neo-Gothic cathedral was built a few centuries ago and over time has been renovated several times. Near the cathedral is the Archbishop's Palace, still intact with the fortress walls built in the Middle Ages to protect the cathedral. Nearby is the Croatian parliament and the presidential palace.

Another top attraction in town is the Church of St. Mark's. Built in the 14 century, it has an unusual roof painted in the colors of the national flag of Croatia.

One of the oldest streets of the Upper City is street Tkachicheva. One of the most popular destinations for city dwellers and tourists. Tkachicheva originates from the Central area and leads into the old city. Almost all of it consists of many small restaurants, cafes and shops which are always filled with tourists.

Zagreb is one of the greenest cities in Eastern Europe owing to the numerous parks that it has. The most famous of which is the park "Maksimir" spread out over an area of 18 hectares. The park was opened to the public at 1794 and has since become the first of its kind city based park in Eastern Europe.

The Croatian capital has a lot to offer. It is unfortunate that it is missed by most tourists owing to its central location, away from the shores of the country. Tourists should take time out to visit this Eastern European city.