10 Best Travel Blazer

Updated on: May 2021

Best Travel Blazer in 2021


Amazon Brand - Goodthreads Men's Standard-Fit Stretch Twill Blazer, Charcoal, X-Large

Amazon Brand - Goodthreads Men's Standard-Fit Stretch Twill Blazer, Charcoal, X-Large
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021
  • This twill blazer can be worn with chinos or jeans for a look that can be dressed-up or casual
  • Three exterior patch pockets, two-button closure and four button cuffs
  • Model is 6'2" and wearing a size Medium
  • Goodthreads' blazers are sized like our button-down shirts, they are available in Slim-Fit and Standard-Fit and in alpha sizes (XS-XXX Large)

Amazon Brand - Goodthreads Men's Slim-Fit Stretch Twill Blazer, Olive, Large

Amazon Brand - Goodthreads Men's Slim-Fit Stretch Twill Blazer, Olive, Large
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • This twill blazer can be worn with chinos or jeans for a look that can be dressed-up or casual
  • Three exterior patch pockets, two-button closure and four button cuffs
  • Model is 6'2" and wearing a size Medium
  • Goodthreads' blazers are sized like our button-down shirts, they are available in Slim-Fit and Standard-Fit and in alpha sizes (XS-XXX Large)

Eddie Bauer Men's Voyager 2.0 Travel Blazer, Black Regular 46

Eddie Bauer Men's Voyager 2.0 Travel Blazer, Black Regular 46
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
  • Built rugged and wears refined. This performance-stretch blazer is all about comfort and life on the road. The nylon/spandex Flexion soft shell fabric is rugged, breathable, and packable making this the ideal casual blazer for men. Designed with wrinkle-resistance in mind.
  • Perfect for work or casual travel - dress up your look without sacrificing function, great for those with a rigorous travel schedule too.
  • This casual blazer includes StormRepel durable water-resistant (DWR) finish that sheds moisture. Intelligent pocketing includes exclusive TripZip interior pocket for organizing boarding pass, passport, phone, and other essentials, and features a zip compartment with media port.
  • Features include: mesh lining, detachable throat collar, 94% nylon/6% spandex shell; 100% polyester lining.
  • Available in Regular and Tall sizes. Average length: Reg 29.5 inches, Tall 31.5 inches. Active Fit: Our most athletic fit - close to the body without restricting mobility.

Haggar Clothing Men's Tailored Fit In Motion Blazer - 40 Regular - Midnight

Haggar Clothing Men's Tailored Fit In Motion Blazer - 40 Regular - Midnight
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • Two-button blazer in tailored fit with side vents and notched lapel
  • Front flap pocket
  • Welt pocket at left chest

Amazon Essentials Men's Unlined Knit Sport Coat, Light Gray Heather, X-Large

Amazon Essentials Men's Unlined Knit Sport Coat, Light Gray Heather, X-Large
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • A modern unlined knit sport coat with a two button closure and three button cuff detail
  • Unlined for a comfortable, casual look
  • Everyday made better: we listen to customer feedback and fine-tune every detail to ensure quality, fit, and comfort
  • Model is 6'1" and wearing a size Medium

Amazon Essentials Men's Long-Sleeve Classic-fit Button-Front Stretch Blazer, Navy, 38

Amazon Essentials Men's Long-Sleeve Classic-fit Button-Front Stretch Blazer, Navy, 38
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • This classic-fit button-front stretch blazer features a mid-weight fabric for all-season wear
  • Two-button closure, Long sleeves,Two front flap pockets. Single welt pocket at left chest is only for design
  • Everyday made better: we listen to customer feedback and fine-tune every detail to ensure quality, fit, and comfort

Amazon Brand - Goodthreads Men's Standard-Fit Wool Blazer, navy, X-Large

Amazon Brand - Goodthreads Men's Standard-Fit Wool Blazer, navy, X-Large
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • This warm blazer constructed in heavyweight wool can be worn with chinos or jeans for a look that can be dressed-up or casual
  • Three exterior patch pockets, two interior slit pockets, plaid flannel used on interior butterfly lining and seam binding
  • Model is 6'2" and wearing a size Medium
  • Goodthreads' blazers are sized like our button-down shirts, they are available in Slim-Fit and Standard-Fit and in alpha sizes (XS-XXX Large)

Kenneth Cole REACTION Men's Techni-Cole Stretch Slim Fit Suit Separate Blazer (Blazer, Pant, and Vest), Black, 44 Long

Kenneth Cole REACTION Men's Techni-Cole Stretch Slim Fit Suit Separate Blazer (Blazer, Pant, and Vest), Black, 44 Long
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021
  • Blazer, pant, and vest sold separately
  • Stretch fabric. Fully lined interior
  • Double vented

chouyatou Men's Casual Three-Button Stripe Lined Cotton Twill Suit Jacket (Large, Army Green)

chouyatou Men's Casual Three-Button Stripe Lined Cotton Twill Suit Jacket (Large, Army Green)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021
  • Fabric: 100%cotton
  • Classic lapel collar, three-button closure
  • Long sleeves with elbow patches, three buttons on sleeve open
  • Back double side slits, stripe printed lining, one chest pocket and waist patched pockets, inside entry pockets
  • Made in China and Shipped from China, free shipping need 7-14 days arrived

chouyatou Men's Lightweight Half Lined Two-Button Suit Blazer (Large, Dark Grey)

chouyatou Men's Lightweight Half Lined Two-Button Suit Blazer (Large, Dark Grey)
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
  • Fabric: 75%Linen/25%Cotton
  • Turn down lapel collar, slim fit pattern
  • Long sleeves with buttons, front two-button placket
  • Front chest and waist patched pockets, Half printed lining
  • Made in China and Shipped from China, free shipping need 7-14 days arrived

Lady Doc Sofie Herzog: Texas Medical Trailblazer

Story of Sofie Herzog, pioneer female Texas doctor.

Startled residents and passersby heard raised voices-one male, the other female--coming from the house. A heated argument, one that seemed to involve the man running down the street, was in progress. When one person yelled, the other shouted back even louder.

The confrontation inside was between Randolph Prell and his mother-in-law, Dr. Sofie Herzog. Vigorously shaking his finger, he remonstrated with her for allowing a smallpox patient in his home. The doctor, wagging her finger right back, told Prell that how she handled her patients was her business, not his. And how dare him chase the poor man out of the house? He needed treatment, not trauma.

The shouting grew so loud, as was later related, "that dishes rattled on the kitchen shelves."

The argument ran its course, and so, presumably, did the patient's disease. Prell and his mother-in-law eventually resumed speaking to each other, but the incident convinced the doctor it was time to relocate her office. She began construction of her own house. Two rooms would be for her medical practice, the other would serve as her residence.

The story of the doctor's noisy set to with her son-in-law did nothing to detract from her local image as an eccentric. Not only was she the first female doctor in Brazoria County, she was the first female surgeon in Texas.

Born in Vienna, Austria on Feb. 4, 1846, Sofie Dalia was the daughter of a doctor. When she was 14 or 15 -- accounts vary -- she was married to Dr. August Herzog. Like her father, Herzog was a respected Vienna physician. The couple had 15 children, including three sets of twins, but eight of those children died as infants.

In 1886, the family moved to New York, where Dr. Herzog took a staff position at the U.S. Naval Hospital. With her children grown, Sofie decided that she, too, wanted to practice medicine. She went back to Vienna, where she earned a medical degree from the University of Graz. Returning to the U.S., she undertook additional medical instruction in New York. After completing this further study, she opened a practice in Hoboken, N.J.

The couple's youngest daughter, Elfriede Marie, was teaching school in Philadelphia when she met a merchant visiting from Texas, Randolph Prell. They married on Jan. 24, 1894 and Prell returned to Texas with his bride. When their first child was on the way a year later, the couple took the train to New Jersey so Elfriede's physician-mother could handle the delivery.

Soon after a new life began, Dr. Herzog died. Suddenly a widow and with her children scattered, Sofie decided to join her daughter in Texas. As one contemporary newspaper article reported, the doctor believed "that a wider field for her endeavors existed" in the Lone Star State. Too, she could dote over her new grandchild. The doctor lived with Elfriede and Prell in Brazoria until the dust up over the small pox patient.

The lady doctor's arrival in the small coastal community had created quite a stir. She was not the first woman doctor in Texas (that distinction is believed to belong to Dr. Margaret Ellen Holland who began a practice in Houston in 1871) but when she came to Texas in 1895 she was a pioneer in a field dominated by men. Queen Victoria still reigned in England, and so did the prim and proper mindset of an age that came to be called Victorian in her honor.

"A beautiful woman who talked familiarly about all parts of the human anatomy was as great a curiosity to the natives as they were to her and she immediately became the chief topic of conversation," one writer later said of the doctor.

The fact that she wore her hair cropped short and rode a horse like a man, disdaining a sidesaddle, was the talk of the town. But the doctor had two things going for her: She was good at what she did, having been trained in the city that was then the world center of medicine, and she was one of the few doctors in the area. When someone had a broken bone that needed setting or a baby about to be born, most folks were not too picky about the gender of their doctor. Soon the people of Brazoria County were calling her simply Doctor Sofie.

One rainy Sunday night, Dr. Sofie learned first hand that smoking can be dangerous to a person's health. She had been called to the small town of Hawkinsville to see a patient. Eight miles from Brazoria, as the doctor graciously held the reins of the buggy so her driver could roll a cigarette, a wheel went off the b ridge they were crossing. The horses lunged, hurling the driver into a slough. Worse, the horse broke the doubletree.

When the driver climbed out of the water, Dr. Sofie suggested that he cut a piece of wood and improvise a replacement. The driver asserted, as a local newspaper reported soon after, that he was no "buggy doctor." His recommendation was that they ride the two horses to a nearby farm house for help.

The doctor, however, did not feel she was dressed for such a ride and refused.

"They finally started walking for a...house two miles away," the newspaper article said. "They doctor was in front carrying a lantern and her heavy satchel of instruments. [The driver] followed, packing a heavy grip and leading the horses. The doctor lost one shoe and then the other, but on they went until the light of the cabin was seen."

The occupant of the house loaned the driver a doubletree. By 5:30 a.m., the patient had been treated and the exhausted, muddy doctor was finally back home.

Her driver, the article concluded, had "lost all his apostolic religion and swears he'll never driver the doctor again. The doctor swears the same thing."

Joining the Texas Medical Association early-on, she seldom missed a meeting. She was a frequent speaker and won several recognitions.

Eight years after Dr. Sofie moved to Texas, a developer named Uriah Lott founded the St. Louis, Brownsville amp; Mexican Railway. Lott never achieved his goal of connecting St. Louis to Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, but his line brought the first rail service to much of South Texas, stretching from Brownsville to Houston-via Brazoria County.

As construction began on the section between Robstown and Bay City and on toward Houston, Dr. Sofie's business picked up. Construction accidents were common. So were shooting and stabbing scrapes involving the track layers. Word of her medical skills and pleasing bedside manner spread up and down the line.

She made calls in her buggy or, if roads were too muddy for her wagon, she traveled astride a horse. Often, she rode on handcars, boxcars or train engines to get to someone along the line who needed the services of a doctor.

In 1906 or early 1907, the railroad formalized its relationship with the doctor, appointing her chief surgeon of the S.L.B.. amp; M. She got the job over several male surgeons who also applied. When word reached the railroad's headquarters that a female surgeon had been hired by a division official, Dr. Sofie received a polite, carefully-worded letter. The female surgeon was asked to relinquish her position.

"I'll keep this job so long as I give satisfaction," she is said to have replied to the railroad management. "If I fail, then you can free me."

Though Dr. Sofie was a woman in what most people of her time considered a man's job, she never gave the railroad cause to fire her. She frequently stressed that she "wanted no odds" because she was a woman. She remained on the line's payroll for the rest of her life.

Even if the railroad had fired her, the S.L.B. amp; M was far from her sole source of income. She continued her thriving private practice and dabbled in real estate. Over the years, beginning in 1907, she purchased numerous lots in Brazoria. In association with a Houston land development company, Dr. Sofie had a two-and-a-half story frame hotel built across the street from her home and office. The Southern Hotel became the town's social center.

At a crowded affair marking the hotel's grand opening, the disgruntled wife of a former railway employee, believing Dr. Sofie had somehow cost her husband his job, fired a shotgun blast at the doctor. The load of lead ripped a ragged hole in a screen door, narrowly missing the doctor. Dr. Sofie laughed off the incident and the party went on.

Not that the doctor did not know what a firearm could do to a human body. She had become particularly adept at removing bullets from gunshot victims. She presented a paper at a meeting of the South Texas Medical Association on one of her techniques: Elevating a gunshot patient to such an extent that gravity could help her in getting the lead out, so to speak. Only twice in her career was she unsuccessful in recovering a bullet. When she had accumulated more than a score extracted pieces of lead--each representing a successful procedure--she had a jeweler fashion her a necklace with a gold bead threaded between each slug. She wore it as a good luck piece for the rest of her life. No matter whether it worked for her, it certainly represented luck on the part of 24 patients.

Dr. Sofie collected more than bullets. She had a world class collection of carved walking sticks. Another of her collecting interests was stuffed animals, birds and snakes. She did her taxidermy work herself, skinning rattlesnakes and nailing their hide to the side of her carriage house to dry. Shelves in her office also were laden with jars of malformed fetuses and full-term babies with deformities, including one with two heads and three arms. Though preserving the results of genetics gone awry did have a certain scientific value, she also used the specimens to convince women to take better care of themselves during their pregnancies.

Judging from contemporary accounts, Dr. Sofie's investment in her profession was exceeded only by the joy she found in her children and grandchildren.

"Few professional women," one newspaper said of the doctor, "have succeeded in better combining the duties of home and career."

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Abridged from a story by Mike Cox originally published in Texas Medicine, magazine of the Texas Medical Association.

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